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One-week Study Group – Sunday 16 July

Following the 8am service on Sunday 16 July, Canon Dr Stephen Ames and members of the 8am congregation will meet for coffee and cake, and to discuss a paper by economist and development expert Kate Raworth, which looks at how the current, outdated economic mindset needs to change to cope with the social and ecological challenges of the 21st century. Stephen will be posing the question ‘What light does our Christian faith cast on this paper to help us see how we as Christians might respond?’ Members of the 10.30am congregation (and others) are invited to come early and join the discussion – the paper is available here.

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State Funeral – Wednesday 17 May

The State Funeral for Mr Lou Richards MBE will be held at St Paul’s Cathedral on Wednesday 17 May, at 11am.

For those wishing to attend, details of the service can be found here: http://www.vic.gov.au/news/state-funeral-service-for-mr-lewis-lou-richards-mbe.html

Please note that the Cathedral will not be open to the public on Wednesday morning. Also note that Mainly Music, 12.15pm Eucharist, and the Lunchtime Concert will not run on Wednesday.

Anglican-Roman Catholic Evensong a first

Pentecost Sunday, 4 June 2017, sees the first joint Choral Evensong led by the joint choirs of St Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cathedral Melbourne and St Paul’s Cathedral.

Marking the end of the week-long shared prayer for Christian Unity in the Southern hemisphere, the two choirs will for the first time share in leading worship together. While St Paul’s Cathedral Choir has, in the past, been privileged to perform at St Patrick’s, the two choirs have never performed together in their more than 125 year history.

The preacher at this special Evensong will be the Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral, the Very Revd John Salvano.

Anglican Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, said: “We are delighted to share in worshipping together at the culmination of the annual Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. As part of the northern hemisphere’s celebrations, a first Evensong took place in St Peter’s Basilica: it’s therefore highly appropriate that we are able to share this beautiful liturgical tradition and invite our friends from St Patrick’s Cathedral Choir to sing with our own choir”. Dr Loewe said that the service would bring together more than 50 singers: “It will not only be an historical occasion, but quite a spectacular musical performance”.

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Digitisation of Chapter Minutes

St Paul’s Cathedral Archives acknowledges most gratefully the grant of $2394 in terms of the Local History Grants program, administered by Public Record Office Victoria. The funds were given for the digitisation of the first three volumes of the Minutes of meetings of the Cathedral Chapter.

The volumes record the decisions made by the governing body of the Cathedral between 1878 and 1944 and are crucial to the history and decision-making processes of the Cathedral.  They also record much that is of interest to the life of the City of Melbourne during that period.

The work has been completed and the old and fragile volumes can now be packed away safely. Access to the digitised copy will be available in the Cathedral Archives by appointment. The earliest volume may be made available online in the future.

PRO and vic gov logos

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Cross – God’s Instrument of Salvation (Good Friday)

On this page you can find details of the sixth of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may also watch or read the firstsecondthird, fourth and fifth addresses.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for Good Friday: Isaiah 52 : 13 – 53 : 12, Psalm 22 : 1 – 21, Romans 6 : 5-14, John 19

Dean’s Address:

 

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and the events of Holy Week from Palm Sunday to Good Friday, consider the emotions that Jesus’ disciples might have experienced as one event moved to the next throughout that event-filled week. How might you have reacted if you were among them that week?
  • If someone who had never heard the story of the Cross asked you how the Cross became God’s instrument of salvation, what would you say?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas said, We stand and we are silenced at the enormous gift of God’s love that led his own Son to die the lonesome death of a criminal. Who in his dying put an end to all death, and in his agony took away all sin. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all. The life he lived, and the life he will live, he lives to God.” How have you, how do you, or how will you, respond to that “enormous gift of God’s love that led his own Son to die the lonesome death of a criminal”?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas reminded us that we have “boundless opportunity to life our lives for the author, and restorer of our life”. How can we live in such a way?  What does such living mean for you?

Two verses from Romans on which to reflect in the days before Easter Day:

‘The death he died he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God.  So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.”  Rom. 6 : 10-11

 A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

Lord Jesus Christ, my Saviour and my King, thank you for living and dying for me, so that I might know your saving grace in my life and have the assurance of everlasting life.  There are no words sufficient to express the depth of my gratitude for your forgiveness and love.  Thank you for that “amazing grace that saved a wretch like me”.  Help me to live every day in love of you and of my neighbours, to your glory.  Amen

 

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Salvation – New life for all who love God

On this page you can find details of the fifth of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may also watch or read the first address, the second addressthe third address, and the fourth address.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on God’s gift of salvation – God’s work of healing and restoration.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Fifth Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: Ezekiel 37.1-14: The valley of dry bones, John 11.1-45: The Raising of Lazarus, and Romans 8.6-11: Dying to sin, rising to life.

Dean’s Address:

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “salvation” to someone who had never heard the term?
  • Reflecting again on Dean Andreas’s sermon and on our readings today, what is the work of the Holy Spirit when we receive our salvation by grace, through faith in the saving work of Jesus Christ?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas reminded us that Paul told the church in Rome that there is a choice to be made.
    • What is that choice?
    • What is it that Paul says we must “set our minds on”? (see                            Romans 8:6)
    • What is the result of setting minds this way?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas stated: “the decision to pursue the works of the Spirit is, indeed, a daily commitment”. How is such a daily commitment practically lived out, what does it entail?


Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

If you have not yet made a commitment to follow Jesus, I would encourage you to talk to one of our Cathedral clergy, or another Christian to find out more about what following Christ entails. If you have already made a commitment to discipleship, I encourage you to pray for those who have to make this step. Continue to pray for those five friends, acquaintances, or work colleagues you began praying for at the beginning of Lent, that they might come to know the life-giving power of the Holy Spirit, which God bestows on those who love him as the guide to eternal life. … Pray that God would give you his Spirit of love to make you an effective ambassador of his good news.


A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

Saving God, we give you thanks that you breathe your life-giving Spirit into those whose faith is placed in the saving work of your Son, Jesus Christ. Thank you for your grace, so freely given, and for eternal life that comes to all whose trust is placed in you. Help us to be daily committed to the work of the Spirit and give us courage to share your good news with those around us. These things we pray through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Grace – God restores all life

On this page you can find details of the fourth of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may also watch or read the first address, the second address, and the third address.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on God’s gift of grace – God’s work of healing and restoration.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Fourth Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: 1 Samuel 16.1-13: David is anointed KingJohn 9.1-41: The man born blind, and Romans 5.12-21: Adam and Christ.

Dean’s Address:

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Grace” to someone who had never heard the term?
  • Reflecting again on Dean Andreas’s sermon and on the words of Romans 5:12-15, try to answer these questions:

(i)        How did sin enter the world?

(ii)       What is the result of sin?

(iii)      How did God’s grace overcome the effect of sin?

Rom. 5:12   Therefore, just as sin came into the world through one man, and death came through sin, and so death spread to all because all have sinned— 13 sin was indeed in the world before the law, but sin is not reckoned when there is no law. 14 Yet death exercised dominion from Adam to Moses, even over those whose sins were not like the transgression of Adam, who is a type of the one who was to come. 15  But the free gift is not like the trespass. For if the many died through the one man’s trespass, much more surely have the grace of God and the free gift in the grace of the one man, Jesus Christ, abounded for the many.

  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas stated that Grace is God’s gift to humankind. Later he reminded us that St Paul assures us that many found eternal life through the gift of the one man, Jesus Christ. Dean Andreas said, “The free gift does not enslave; its sets free, so that all may have life forever.”

(i)        What does it mean to be “set free”?

(ii)       How can a person have “life forever”?

  • John Newton, who wrote the hymn, “Amazing Grace”, spoke of being healed from spiritual blindness through God’s grace. In what ways might people be spiritually blind? How do those who believe obtain spiritual sight? 

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

In the week ahead continue to pray with me that God’s kingdom would come, that he would bend our wills to his, so that his will be done for you and for me, and through us, for this world. Pray also that God’s love would be manifested to the five people for whom you and I began praying at the beginning of Lent – and if you are coming new to this, it is not too late to start praying that five friends, work colleagues or acquaintances come to love Jesus, God’s gift of grace to us. Pray that we may be signs of God’s grace in our world, and that we may be thankful day by day for his amazing gift.

 A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

“Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound that saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost, but now I’m found, was blind, but now I see.”

Gracious God, whose love for your creation is beyond measure, we thank you for your blessings to us and to all people. Embolden us with your love that we might show forth that love in the world, to our families, neighbours, fellow workers and friends. May your kingdom truly come, may your will be done on Earth as it is in heaven. May the Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit, be with us all, now and always. Amen

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Just Water: Full Program – view again

Expert Panel: Profs Langford and Rayner (University of Melbourne)

As part of our Just Water conference, two world experts on water and the effects of climate change on water, Prof John Langford AM and Prof Peter Rayner, both of the University of Melbourne discussed the challenges to safe and sustainable water supply to our nation.

The discussion and the questions and answers session is moderated by ABC Science’s Tim Thwaites. Dean Andreas Loewe introduces the conference, and Canon Heather Patacca leads into the theme of water, sustainability, and water security.

View the Discussion Again

 

Combined Worship: Archbishop Winston Halapua

We joined for worship with our conference partner Trinity Church Wall Street, New Yorke, at which the Archbishop of Polynesia preached.

View the Service again

 

Keynote address: The Hon. Barbara Boxer

In her keynote address former US Senator Barbara Boxer, a leader on environmental protection who introduced the National Oceans Protection Act (2005), addressed ocean governance and pollution and protect and restore wildlife and habitats

View Senator Boxer’s Keynote Address again

 

Practitioner Forum: Tom Müller (WaterAid) and Alison Preston (AOA)

Does Aid Work? A discussion between aid groups, including Anglican Overseas Aid and Water Aid, involved in ensuring easy access for all to clean water discuss on the value of international aid and why it is worth it.

View the Forum again

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Justification – God’s greatest work of love

On this page you can find details of the third of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may also watch the first address and the second address.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on God’s gift of justification – the power to set people free from the power of sin and evil.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Third Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: Exodus 17.1-7 – Quarrels at Meribah and Massah, John 4.5-42: Jesus meets the Samaritan Woman, and Romans 5.1-11: God pours his love in our hearts.

Dean’s Address:

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Justification” to someone who had never heard the term? Does a person need to be free of sin in order to be justified?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas outlined how the Scriptures teach us a person can be “saved”. What does it mean to be “saved”?  How can a person know that they are indeed saved?  From what are we saved?
  • Over the past three weeks, Dean Andreas has taught us concerning Sin, Faith, Justification and Salvation. What is the relationship between these four terms?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas said: “Through his love, God grants us his peace, and out of the strength of that peace we are enabled to live in a world that often knows no peace.”   Reflecting on these words and on Romans 5:3-5, how does a person’s justification allow them to find strength in the face of hardship? [Romans 5:3-5 “…  we also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,  and endurance produces character, and character produces           hope,  and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.”]

 

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

I invite you to pray with me that each day we may choose to place our trust, ‘our lively faith’ in Jesus Christ and his gift of himself for us so that we might have life with him forever. You may wish to pray a prayer of commitment and trust in God’s ready help: ‘Lord Jesus Christ, my Saviour, help me’. Or you might wish to continue praying lines from the Lord’s Prayer, ‘Lord Jesus, thy Kingdom come, thy will be done’. Especially if you feel wearied or uncertain, I encourage you to pray these simple prayers. Pray intentionally and sustainedly. Pray that you might be enabled to enter into the labour of others, to become a witness enabling others to hear and know for themselves that Jesus ‘truly is the Saviour of the world’ (John 5.42).

 A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

Saving God, thank you for your great love in sending your Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, into the world to be its saviour.  Thank you for justification and salvation that is ours through faith in His saving work on the cross. Enable us to enter into the labour of others, by witnessing to our friends and neighbours so that they may know from themselves that Jesus is truly “the Saviour of the world.”  In His name we pray.  Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Faith – God saves all who believe

On this page you can find details of the second of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may watch the first address here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on the gift of faith and its power to transform lives, and to give us new directions and hope.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Second Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: Genesis 12.1-4a – The Call to Abram (bible.oremus.org/?ql=355844084), John 3.1-17: Jesus meets Nicodemus (bible.oremus.org/?ql=355844352), and Romans 4.1-17: God saves all who believe
(bible.oremus.org/?ql=355844301).

Dean’s Address:

]

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Faith” to someone who had never heard the term? Is there a difference between “Faith” and “Belief”?
  • Dean Andreas reminded us that the writer of the Hebrews declared “Faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen” (Hebrews 11.1). What are those things that as Christians we hope for?  What are the “unseen” things to which the writer refers?
  • How does St Paul state that one is declared to be righteous (justified) before God? (Romans 4:3-5)   How does this differ from the understanding many people in society have about how a person achieves righteousness?
  • What does it mean to “turn in faith to Jesus”? 

A Question for Personal Reflection During the Week:

When was it that I turned to Jesus Christ in faith?  Or have  I yet to put my trust in Jesus to save me, knowing that it is only through faith in Him, that a person can be put right with God?

If you are unsure about the answer to these questions, and would like to be sure, why not chat with one of the Cathedral clergy or another trusted Christian friend in order to discuss them further.

A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

When was it that I turned to Jesus Christ in faith?  Or have  I yet to put my trust in Jesus to save me, knowing that it is only through faith in Him, that a person can be put right with God?

If you are unsure about the answer to these questions, and would like to be sure, why not chat with one of the Cathedral clergy or another trusted Christian friend in order to discuss them further.

Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017