Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Grace – God restores all life

On this page you can find details of the fourth of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may also watch or read the first address, the second address, and the third address.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on God’s gift of grace – God’s work of healing and restoration.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Fourth Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: 1 Samuel 16.1-13: David is anointed KingJohn 9.1-41: The man born blind, and Romans 5.12-21: Adam and Christ.

Dean’s Address:

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Grace” to someone who had never heard the term?
  • Reflecting again on Dean Andreas’s sermon and on the words of Romans 5:12-15, try to answer these questions:

(i)        How did sin enter the world?

(ii)       What is the result of sin?

(iii)      How did God’s grace overcome the effect of sin?

Rom. 5:12   Therefore, just as sin came into the world through one man, and death came through sin, and so death spread to all because all have sinned— 13 sin was indeed in the world before the law, but sin is not reckoned when there is no law. 14 Yet death exercised dominion from Adam to Moses, even over those whose sins were not like the transgression of Adam, who is a type of the one who was to come. 15  But the free gift is not like the trespass. For if the many died through the one man’s trespass, much more surely have the grace of God and the free gift in the grace of the one man, Jesus Christ, abounded for the many.

  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas stated that Grace is God’s gift to humankind. Later he reminded us that St Paul assures us that many found eternal life through the gift of the one man, Jesus Christ. Dean Andreas said, “The free gift does not enslave; its sets free, so that all may have life forever.”

(i)        What does it mean to be “set free”?

(ii)       How can a person have “life forever”?

  • John Newton, who wrote the hymn, “Amazing Grace”, spoke of being healed from spiritual blindness through God’s grace. In what ways might people be spiritually blind? How do those who believe obtain spiritual sight? 

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

In the week ahead continue to pray with me that God’s kingdom would come, that he would bend our wills to his, so that his will be done for you and for me, and through us, for this world. Pray also that God’s love would be manifested to the five people for whom you and I began praying at the beginning of Lent – and if you are coming new to this, it is not too late to start praying that five friends, work colleagues or acquaintances come to love Jesus, God’s gift of grace to us. Pray that we may be signs of God’s grace in our world, and that we may be thankful day by day for his amazing gift.

 A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

“Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound that saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost, but now I’m found, was blind, but now I see.”

Gracious God, whose love for your creation is beyond measure, we thank you for your blessings to us and to all people. Embolden us with your love that we might show forth that love in the world, to our families, neighbours, fellow workers and friends. May your kingdom truly come, may your will be done on Earth as it is in heaven. May the Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit, be with us all, now and always. Amen

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Just Water: Panel Discussion – view again

As part of our Just Water conference, two world experts on water and the effects of climate change on water, Prof John Langford AM and Prof Peter Rayner, both of the University of Melbourne discussed the challenges to safe and sustainable water supply to our nation.

The discussion and the questions and answers session is moderated by ABC Science’s Tim Thwaites. Dean Andreas Loewe introduces the conference, and Canon Heather Patacca leads into the theme of water, sustainability, and water security.

View the Discussion Again

Follow Just Water 2017 online

If you’re unable to join us for Just Water 2017, live streams of all our sessions will be available online.

Follow this link for tonight’s panel discussion with Professors John Langford AM and Peter Rayner, moderated by Tim Thwaites, live from 6pm.

And follow this link for all our Thursday sessions:
10am combined worship with Trinity Church Wall Street
11am keynote address by former US Senator Barbara Boxer
1.30pm “Does Aid Work?” panel discussion with Anglican Overseas Aid and Water Aid

 

0

Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Justification – God’s greatest work of love

On this page you can find details of the third of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may also watch the first address and the second address.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on God’s gift of justification – the power to set people free from the power of sin and evil.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Third Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: Exodus 17.1-7 – Quarrels at Meribah and Massah, John 4.5-42: Jesus meets the Samaritan Woman, and Romans 5.1-11: God pours his love in our hearts.

Dean’s Address:

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Justification” to someone who had never heard the term? Does a person need to be free of sin in order to be justified?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas outlined how the Scriptures teach us a person can be “saved”. What does it mean to be “saved”?  How can a person know that they are indeed saved?  From what are we saved?
  • Over the past three weeks, Dean Andreas has taught us concerning Sin, Faith, Justification and Salvation. What is the relationship between these four terms?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas said: “Through his love, God grants us his peace, and out of the strength of that peace we are enabled to live in a world that often knows no peace.”   Reflecting on these words and on Romans 5:3-5, how does a person’s justification allow them to find strength in the face of hardship? [Romans 5:3-5 “…  we also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,  and endurance produces character, and character produces           hope,  and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.”]

 

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

I invite you to pray with me that each day we may choose to place our trust, ‘our lively faith’ in Jesus Christ and his gift of himself for us so that we might have life with him forever. You may wish to pray a prayer of commitment and trust in God’s ready help: ‘Lord Jesus Christ, my Saviour, help me’. Or you might wish to continue praying lines from the Lord’s Prayer, ‘Lord Jesus, thy Kingdom come, thy will be done’. Especially if you feel wearied or uncertain, I encourage you to pray these simple prayers. Pray intentionally and sustainedly. Pray that you might be enabled to enter into the labour of others, to become a witness enabling others to hear and know for themselves that Jesus ‘truly is the Saviour of the world’ (John 5.42).

 A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

Saving God, thank you for your great love in sending your Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, into the world to be its saviour.  Thank you for justification and salvation that is ours through faith in His saving work on the cross. Enable us to enter into the labour of others, by witnessing to our friends and neighbours so that they may know from themselves that Jesus is truly “the Saviour of the world.”  In His name we pray.  Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Faith – God saves all who believe

On this page you can find details of the second of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation. You may watch the first address here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on the gift of faith and its power to transform lives, and to give us new directions and hope.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Second Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

Do read the following Bible readings: Genesis 12.1-4a – The Call to Abram (bible.oremus.org/?ql=355844084), John 3.1-17: Jesus meets Nicodemus (bible.oremus.org/?ql=355844352), and Romans 4.1-17: God saves all who believe
(bible.oremus.org/?ql=355844301).

Dean’s Address:

]

You may read a transcript of the address here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Faith” to someone who had never heard the term? Is there a difference between “Faith” and “Belief”?
  • Dean Andreas reminded us that the writer of the Hebrews declared “Faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen” (Hebrews 11.1). What are those things that as Christians we hope for?  What are the “unseen” things to which the writer refers?
  • How does St Paul state that one is declared to be righteous (justified) before God? (Romans 4:3-5)   How does this differ from the understanding many people in society have about how a person achieves righteousness?
  • What does it mean to “turn in faith to Jesus”? 

A Question for Personal Reflection During the Week:

When was it that I turned to Jesus Christ in faith?  Or have  I yet to put my trust in Jesus to save me, knowing that it is only through faith in Him, that a person can be put right with God?

If you are unsure about the answer to these questions, and would like to be sure, why not chat with one of the Cathedral clergy or another trusted Christian friend in order to discuss them further.

A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

When was it that I turned to Jesus Christ in faith?  Or have  I yet to put my trust in Jesus to save me, knowing that it is only through faith in Him, that a person can be put right with God?

If you are unsure about the answer to these questions, and would like to be sure, why not chat with one of the Cathedral clergy or another trusted Christian friend in order to discuss them further.

Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Passion, Lament, Glory

Date: Friday 31 March and Saturday 1 April 2017
Time: 7.30PM
Venue: St Paul’s Cathedral, Cnr of Swanston Street and Flinders Street, Melbourne
Cost: $30 Full / $15 Concession
Booking: Eventbrite online.

Directed by Jane Davidson, this performance presents a highly original enactment of the Passion of Christ that includes spectacular aerial artistry. Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater serves as the musical centrepiece, alongside choruses from Handel’s Messiah and other beloved works. Internationally acclaimed conductor Erin Helyard will lead a top baroque ensemble, and Stephen Grant will direct over 100 voices from the Vocal Studies Department at The University of Melbourne, Dean Andreas Loewe will tell the story of the cross and passion as part of the performance.

0

Walk with Mary – 26 March

Walk with Mary

The Walk with Mary has taken place in Melbourne on the nearest Sunday to the Feast of the Annunciation each year for 27 years. Apart from the first year, it has ended each time with a service at St Paul’s Cathedral. Although most of the several hundred participants are from the Roman Catholic Church a significant number of Anglicans are always involved and an Anglican Bishop shares with a Roman Catholic Bishop in leadership of the event.  In recent years, as well as being ecumenical, the event has developed a multicultural dimension with national and ethnic groups carrying their distinctive banners and images of the Virgin Mary.

The Walk seeks to honour the young girl who was chosen by God for a unique role of motherhood and who responded faithfully and bravely to this challenge to play such a vital role in God’s plan for the redemption of the world.

The full programme is as follows, but please feel free to join in at any stage:

2pm Prayers at St Patrick’s Cathedral

3pm Mass at St Patrick’s Cathedral. Clergy attending may robe (purple stole).

4.15pm Procession leaves St Patrick’s and proceeds via Macarthur Place, Collins and Swanston Streets to St Paul’s Cathedral.

4.45pm Devotional Service at St Paul’s Cathedral to conclude the pilgrimage (ending around 5.30pm)Speaker: Bishop  Philip Huggins

Contact Revd Canon James Brady for more information: 9653 4304

Dean’s Lent Addresses 2017: Sin – all fall short of the glory of God

On this page you can find details of the first of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2017, “Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done” – Knowing Jesus Christ: Finding Salvation.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, and the ‘thought for the week’ for your personal reflection. You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the First Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the three Bible readings on which this talk is based.

You can click on each to read them in the NRSV version used at St Paul’s: Genesis 3.1-7: The Fall of AdamMatthew 4.1-11: The Temptation of Jesus, and Romans 3.21-26: All fall short of the glory of God.

Dean’s Address:

A transcript of the address may be read here.

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  1. Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, how would you explain “Sin” to someone who had never heard the term? Is there a difference between “Sin” and “Sins”?
  1. What did Paul see as signs of sinfulness in the Roman church? Do these signs exist in our Christian community today?  How does Paul say sin is overcome?
  1. How is Paul’s teaching lived out in our lives today?
  1. Paul teaches that it is through God’s grace and forgiveness that we can be made whole again. What does “Grace” mean in this context?
  1. On Ash Wednesday, when we are marked with ash, the priest says, “Turn away from sin, and be faithful to Christ”. How do we “turn away” from sin?  How can we “be faithful to Christ”?

A Question for Personal Reflection During the Week:

Dean Andreas’s sermon referred to our Gospel reading and the temptation of Jesus in the time immediately after His baptism.  Jesus, the Son of God was tempted and we are told by one of the Gospel writers that the evil one returned to Jesus at other times to tempt him.  “Respectable” people in today’s society don’t often discuss the reality of temptation.  The temptations Jesus faced were subtle and meant to trip him up.  How does temptation affect you?  How do you deal with it?  Are you turning away, and turning to Christ?  If this is a struggle for you, should you speak privately with one of the clergy or a trusted friend about it, in order to be supported?

A Prayer at the end of your Study Time:

God our Father, we thank you for your grace, which is given so freely to all who believe.  We thank you for your Son our Lord Jesus Christ who died so that we might be forgiven for our sin, and can receive eternal life.  During this Lenten time, help us to daily turn away from sin and turn to Him who strengthens us through the power or the Holy Spirit.  Give us courage to share with those around us the wonderful news that sin can be forgiven, and new life is available to all.  These things we pray through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2017

Cathedral Policies

The Cathedral takes issues of safeguarding very seriously. All Cathedral employees and volunteers present current Working with Children Checks and Police certificates. In addition, the Cathedral has policies and codes of conduct in place that seek to promote safe working and worshipping environments. 

On this page staff and volunteers at St Paul’s Cathedral may view current Cathedral policies and codes of conduct applicable to them. A complete set of all guidelines and policies applicable to staff and office holders at St Paul’s may be viewed here: Cathedral Policies 2017.

Cathedral staff may also view current Human Resources policies, IT Policies on the Parish Portal (login with your email credentials).

Faithfulness in Service

Faithfulness in Service is the Code of Conduct for all church employees, lay and ordained, in the Anglican Church of Australia. It applies also to any church volunteers holding church offices (such for instance as welcomers, intercessors, readers or musicians), and volunteers in leadership positions (such as for instance members of the Cathedral Chapter and its committees, as well as Cathedral committees and leadership groups).  The latest version (May 2016) can be viewed online here.

Anglican Diocese of Melbourne Professional Standards Protocols

The Diocesan Protocol for Complaints of Misconduct against Church Volunteers details how complaints against lay church workers are processed under the terms of the Professional Standards Act 2009. The latest version (March 2013) can be viewed online here.

Anglican Diocese of Melbourne Occupational Health and Safety Policies

The Diocesan recommendations on Occupational Health and Safety seek to ensure safe work and worshipping environments. Details of the latest training materials (May 2015), including policies on Privacy (pages 17-18), and good practise models on electronic communications and social media use (pages 19-22), can be viewed online here.


Abuse – making a Professional Standards Complaint

In case of any form of abuse we strongly encourage members to contact the Director of Professional Standards of the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne.

The Director of Professional Standards responds to all complaints of misconduct including sexual, physical, spiritual or emotional abuse by clergy or Church officers. She is as independent as possible from the Diocese but is paid by the Diocese.

The first step in making a complaint is to call the recorded information line at any time on: 1800 135 246. The information you may provide to this service is strictly confidential. The person taking a message on this number will ask you to give a name and your phone number or address so that the Director can contact you as soon as possible. Alternatively, you can write to the Director: Director of Professional Standards, Anglican Diocese of Melbourne, PO Box 329, Canterbury VIC 3126. Please mark your envelope Confidential.

The Director of Professional Standards aims to solve complaints as quickly as possible. There are different ways of dealing with complaints – informally, formally or referring the matter to another Church professional standards body or to a child protection authority or to the Police.