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Gloria

Date: Friday 4 and Saturday 5 May
Time: 7.30pm
Venue: St Paul’s Cathedral, Cnr of Swanston Street and Flinders Street, Melbourne
Cost: $30 Full / $15 Concession
Booking: Online via Eventbrite

An all-sensory experience of historic architectural beauty, modern visual spectacle, choral and orchestral music, and the timeless genius of Vivaldi, presented by the students of the Faculty of Fine Arts and Music, the University of Melbourne.

Featuring the Early Voices and Baroque Ensemble, Stephen Grant (musical director), Erin Helyard (musical director), Jane Davidson (creative director).

Gloria and Beatus vir are two of Vivaldi’s most beautiful and moving choral works. Set within the magnificent St Paul’s Cathedral, and using magical visual imagery, these spellbinding performances offer unique experiences of uplifting emotion.

Featured image © Sarah Walker.
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Child Safe Policy and Code of Conduct

St Paul’s Cathedral is strongly committed to safeguarding the children and vulnerable people who participate in our services and other activities.

As such, we are delighted that a new Child Safe Policy and Code of Conduct for the Diocese of Melbourne have recently been approved by Archbishop in Council. These documents will standardise the safeguarding policies of individual churches, making child protection consistent across the Diocese.

The Cathedral was heavily involved in the creation of these documents; the Code was drafted by a working group led by Canon Chancellor Michael Shand, and including  Dean Andreas, a former member of Chapter, a Choir member and Choir parent, along with representatives from Kooyoora (Diocesan Professional Standards) and the St Hilary’s Network, which has a substantial ministry to children and young people. As one of the most ‘volunteer-rich’ churches in the Diocese, the Cathedral also acted as a testing ground for new compliance requirements, with all our volunteers obtaining Working with Children check and Police Checks, and undertaking Professional Standards training. We have appointed a Compliance officer, to ensure that all clearances are up to date and any anomalies can be swiftly dealt with.

We commend the Diocese of Melbourne for taking this important step, and pray that it will herald a safer and more transparent future.

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2018: The Passion according to St John – Crucified for us

On this page you can find details of the final of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2018, The Passion according to St John: Crucified for us. You can find the first Lent Address here, the second address here, the third here, and the fourth here, and the fifth here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on Jesus’s death on the cross as told in the Passion of St John, and on the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach’s invitation, in a chorale, to become ourselves bearers of that cross by placing it in our hearts.

You can read the reading Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion.

Reading for the Sixth Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the Bible reading on which this talk is based John 19.16-30.

Dean’s Address:

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today:

  • For John, the death of Jesus takes place at the same time as the lambs for the Passover sacrifice are offered. What does John say about the sacrifice of Jesus? What may it mean for Jesus to be ‘the lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world’?
  • Throughout this trial and execution, Pilate sought to provoke the religious authorities, this time by commissioning an inscription declaring Jesus ‘the King of the Jews’. In what way may Jesus be said the King of the Jews, and what does his kingdom look like?
  • On the cross, Jesus entrusts his mother to the care of his cousin and disciple John. How can we become Jesus’ family?
  • Jesus dies with the words, ‘it is finished’ on his lips. What is Jesus’ accomplishment, and how has Jesus completed what he set out to do? How can we show the same obedience and trust to God’s purposes in the works God gives us to do?
  • In Johann Sebastian Bach’s chorale heard at the end of the sermon, he invites us to place the cross of Jesus in our hearts. What would it look like for us to open our hearts to Jesus, and to become a living sanctuary of the cross? What qualities come to mind, when you think about opening your heart to Christ? What things might you need to take up, or let go off in this process?

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

In the week ahead I invite you to open your hearts to Christ: receive him as your consolation in times of adversity and your delight in times of joy, Receive him as your brother, who seeks to number all people among his family. Receive him as your judge, who for us ‘so charitable, has bled himself to death’. Make place in your hearts for his cross as a sign of your confidence, knowing that he who hands over his life to the Father has conquered death, and that he who takes up his life again, gifts all those who receive him a share in the life that is forever.

Prayer at the end of your study time:

Lord Jesus Christ,
you humbled yourself in taking the form of a servant,
and in obedience died on the cross for our salvation:
give us the mind to follow you
and to proclaim you as Lord and King,
to the glory of God the Father. Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2018

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2018: The Passion according to St John – Sentenced to Die

On this page you can find details of the fifth of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2018, The Passion according to St John: Tried for his kingdom. You can find the first Lent Address here, the second address here, the third here, and the fourth here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on Jesus’s death sentence before Pilate as told in the Passion of St John, and on the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach’s reflection in a moving chorale that although we may not recognise in the broken man of sorrows the King of all kings, we know that Jesus’ suffering for us in time is an aspect of his eternal sovereignty.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion.

Readings for the Fifth Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the Bible reading on which this talk is based John 18.38-19.16.

Dean’s Address:

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today:

  • Why do you think the religious leaders called for Jesus Barabbas (whose name means Bar Abbas, ‘Son of the father’) to be set free, rather than the true Son of the Father, Jesus Christ?
  • Do you believe that Pilate really believed that Jesus was innocent and sought to set him free? If so, why did he not follow up on his intention? Was this powerful tyrant in reality powerless, or was he swayed by popular opinion?
  • What does Jesus mean when he says to Pilate, ‘you would have no power over me unless it was given you from above?’ Where does Pilate’s power come from? Why does Jesus’ power, which is shown forth in powerlessness, last forever and Pilate’s is ultimately broken?
  • Does God suffer? Would Pilate, or the religious authorities, have expected God to be a broken, bleeding man? Is that why there were unable to recognise that Jesus is God?
  • In Johann Sebastian Bach’s chorale heard at the end of the sermon, he suggests that Jesus the only way in which we can repay Jesus for the gift of himself is through giving him our love and allegiance. How can we show forth our love for Jesus in the world?

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

In the week ahead I encourage you to reflect on Christ’s gift of love for you. I invite you give thanks for the gift of Christ’s mercy, and to pray that we might be given strength to show forth this mercy and love in our own interactions with others this week – in the way we love, and serve others: at home, at work, and in the places in which we worship.

Prayer at the end of your study time:

Lord God, your Son our Saviour
gave his back to the smiters
and did not hide his face from shame:
give us grace to endure the sufferings of this present time
with sure confidence in the glory that shall be revealed;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2018

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2018: The Passion according to St John – Tried for his Kingdom

On this page you can find details of the fourth of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2018, The Passion according to St John: Tried for his kingdom. You can find the first Lent Address here, the second address here and the third here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on Jesus’s trial before the Roman authorities as told in the Passion of St John, and on the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach’s reflection in a moving chorale that it Jesus’ arrest and suffering is what has set us free.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion.

Readings for the Fourth Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the Bible readings on which this talk is based 1 Timothy 6.11-16, and John 18.28-36.

Dean’s Address:

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today:

  • The religious leaders feared defilement if they entered the Praetorium to hear Jesus’ trial before Pilate? In their eyes, being taken there defiled Jesus.  Consider whether Jesus could actually be defiled in the way they feared for themselves.  What is it that truly defiles a person?
  • Note the religious  leaders’ response to Pilate’s question concerning the charge brought against Jesus. ‘If this man were not a criminal, we would not have handed him over to you’.  What is the implication behind this rather unusual statement?
  • What is the true nature of Jesus’s kingdom? (Consider John 18:33 – 37).
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas highlights the irony of Pilate asking the One who is ‘Truth Incarnate’, and ‘Truth made Flesh’, the now famous question, ‘what is truth’? In his Gospel, John leaves this as a rhetorical question. How might you answer it?
  • In Johann Sebastian Bach’s chorale heard at the end of the sermon, he suggests that Jesus sets all people free by letting himself be imprisoned, making the Praetorium the throne of mercy where we are released from slavery. In what ways is this so?

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

In the week ahead I encourage you to reflect on what the slavery may be from which we need to be set free, what the truth would be that we need to hear to be released. I encourage you to listen to that truth through the words of Jesus, and to re-commit yourself to seeking to follow that truth by bringing before him all that stops us from being open to his word of liberation. I invite you to give thanks for Jesus the Truth, and to pray with me that in him, we may also find our way, and our life.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2018

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2018: The Passion according to St John – Tried for his faith

On this page you can find details of the third of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2018, The Passion according to St John: Tried for his faith. You can find the first Lent Address here, and the second Lent address here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on Jesus’s trial before the religious authorities as told in the Passion of St John, and on the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach’s reflection in a moving chorale that it was our own transgressions that led to Jesus’ suffering.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Third Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the Bible readings on which this talk is based 1 Corinthians 4.7-15 and John 18.13-14, 19-24.

Dean’s Address:

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our reading today, why do you think Jesus is being questioned about his teaching? What might have been so threatening to his questioners about his message?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas reminds us that John makes clear that it was the religious establishment who sought to silence Jesus because he was a popular teacher among the people. What do we do to maintain power and influence, and when might we silence others in order to maintain our own prestige and position?
  • Jesus told his questioner that he had taught publicly, and that his record spoke for himself. A servant of the temple authorities struck him for insolence. Are there times when we turn our back to the public record and would want to strike off the uncomfortable truth?
  • The composer Johann Sebastian Bach makes the link between our own sinfulness and Jesus’ suffering ‘I, I and my sins … have provoked the distress that strikes you’ . In this light, what may ‘turning from sin and turning to Christ’ mean to you? What may we need to confess and give up in ourselves to be better followers of Jesus?

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

God laid on Christ the sins and shortcomings of this world. This insight is as shocking as int would have been in the first century, when Paul wrote in our epistle that ‘death is at work in us’. It was not a particular group of religious or political leaders that led Jesus to die, but our sinfulness. The cause of Jesus’ death, then, lies in each one of us, just as the hope for Jesus’ life is freely given to each of us. In the week ahead, I invite you to lay before God those things that are deadly and kill, and ask for his grace and forgiveness. Ask that God would renew you by the life that Christ won for us when he took on our sins.

A Prayer at the end of your study time:

Almighty God, your Son Jesus Christ turned his face to his betrayer, and let himself be struck by his captors: as we reflect on his suffering on our behalf, help us to lay before him our own sinfulness and acknowledge that it is our shortcomings that led him to the cross. Instil in us a spirit of humility and grace, and restore us to the life that he came to bring through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2018

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2018: The Passion according to St John – Denied

On this page you can find details of the second of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2018, The Passion according to St John: Denied. You can find the first Lent Address here.

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on Peter’s denial of Jesus as told in the Passion of St John, and on the German composer Johann Sebastian Bach’s reflection in a moving chorale on Peter’s reaction to the denial of his friend and master.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the Second Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the Bible reading on which this talk is based: John 18.12, 15-18, 25-27.

Dean’s Address:

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, why do you think Peter, one of the first to be called as a disciple, and the friend whom Jesus called his ‘foundation’, chose to deny him? Have you ever faced a situation where you lied in order to get out of embarrassment or shame?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas reminds us that Jesus did not condemn Peter, but looked at him with compassion. Although Peter denied his friend, Jesus did not deny Peter. What does this teach us about God’s grace and mercy?
  • Peter wanted to give everything for Jesus and defended him with a sword, yet under public pressure he denied knowing him altogether. How does God meet us in our weaknesses? What can we do when we are disloyal, or miss the chance to be strong?
  • After the resurrection, Jesus will ask Peter three times, ‘do you love me’? Do we love Jesus, and how can we show our love for him to others?
  • Jesus has a plan for Peter that goes beyond his denial of his friends. What do you think Jesus is calling you to do when you fail in following his commands?
  • The composer Johann Sebastian Bach makes the link between our lack of contrition, ‘when I have done evil’, and Jesus’ merciful invitation to look at him and be forgiven. In this light, what may ‘turning from sin and turning to Christ’ mean to you? What may we need to deny in ourselves to be better followers of Jesus?

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

“This story is one of restoration and grace: it is possible for a liar to become a hero, is possible for Christ’s denier to become one of his greatest confessors. It is right that Peter should be depicted here in gold and precious stone because he models for us repentance: the one who weeps bitterly as he rues his sin is model for us. This week I  invite you to reflect on what it is that stands between us and God’s love, what it is that we need to bring to God’s gaze of grace in confession.

A Prayer at the end of your study time:

Merciful Lord, you know our struggle to serve you: when sin spoils our lives and overshadows our hearts, come to our help, look upon us with mercy and compassion, and turn us back to you again; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2018

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Join the Cathedral Team as a Head Verger

The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral seek to appoint a Head Verger (Chief ceremonial and operational officer).

St Paul’s Cathedral serves eighteen Sunday and weekday congregations; federal, state, civic and diocesan organisations and individuals; local schools and colleges; arts providers; community groups and associations; and members of the public.

A team of vergers (the Cathedral’s ceremonial and operational staff) ensure that the Cathedral’s fabric and fittings are maintained properly; that the Cathedral is prepared for services and special events; and that worshippers, visitors and pilgrims are able to enjoy the peace of a safe and welcoming environment. They Cathedral’s vergers provide security during opening hours, and ensure the Cathedral is secured out of opening hours.

The Cathedral now seeks to recruit a full-time Head Verger to coordinate the work of the Cathedral’s verger team. The full-time head verger will work with a team of experienced part-time and casual vergers, and will join a friendly, diverse and hardworking team of paid and volunteer Cathedral staff.

View the full position description and application details.

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Dean’s Lent Addresses 2018: The Passion according to St John – Betrayed

On this page you can find details of the first of the Dean of Melbourne’s Lent Addresses 2018, The Passion according to St John: Betrayed. 

For Christians, Lent is a period of renewal and growth.

In this address, the Dean of Melbourne, the Very Revd Dr Andreas Loewe, reflects on the arrest of Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane at the betrayal of his friend and follower, Judas. In his talk, he draws on the gospel text and the music of Johann Sebastian Bach’s St John Passion to reflect on Jesus’ way to the cross.

You can read the readings Dean Andreas reflects on in his talk, and you can watch his talk.

When you have done so, you may wish to use the questions for group reflection our congregations are using for their Lent discussion, You may wish to conclude by praying the prayer used at our Lent discussion.

Readings for the First Sunday in Lent:

You first may wish to read the Bible readings on which this talk is based: Genesis 3.1-15 and John 18.1-18.

Dean’s Address:

Questions for Group Discussion or Individual Reflection:

  • Reflecting on Dean Andreas’s sermon and our readings today, why do you think Judas, one of Jesus’ close friends, chose to betray him? Have you ever faced disloyalty or betrayal from a close friend? If so, what did you do at the time, and what could you do better?
  • In his sermon, Dean Andreas reminds us how St John believed that the course of action of Judas was foreordained. Jesus knew what was about to happen, and did not interfere in his arrest, knowing full well that it would lead to his death. What do Jesus’ actions teach us about trusting God’s will – even in suffering?
  • The composer Johann Sebastian Bach makes the link between our enjoyment of life, and the suffering of Jesus: Jesus took on our sin so that we might live, the chorale Bach chose to accompany this scene tells. In this light, what may ‘turning from sin and turning to Christ’ mean to you? How can we find joy in obedience to Christ’s call?

Dean Andreas’s invitation for the Week ahead:

“This story is an invitation to focus our minds on the way of the cross, is a reminder to travel in heart and mind alongside Jesus, as he walks the way of suffering. Pondering it may be that we stand in need of giving up, and letting go, what holds us back, of what bonds we might need to be freed”. This week I invite you to reflect and pray about what you want to let go this Lent to become a better follower of Jesus.  

A Prayer at the end of your study time:

Holy God, our lives are laid open before you: as your Son set free his followers and let himself be arrested, set us free from the bonds of sin and death, bring us healing and make us whole through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

© The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral Melbourne, 2018